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OpenSSH to provide default protection for networks against quantum computer attacks

OpenSSH to provide default protection for networks against quantum computer attacks
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OpenSSH has said that its latest iteration, OpenSSH9, will have in-built protection against attacks carried out by quantum computers.   

OpenSSH is a software that provides secure networking based on SSH or the Secure Shell Protocol. SSH provides a secure channel in an unsecured network in client-server architectures. 

Quantum computing is known for its potential ability to break modern cryptography in networks, what this means is that it can scan vast distances of networked devices and detect applications that are open, this simplifies the process of finding a loophole in a network for external hackers.   

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“By using the hybrid Streamlined NTRU Prime + x25519 key exchange method by default, the NTRU algorithm is believed to resist attacks enabled by future quantum computers,” OpenSSH said in a statement

OpenSSH said that the SSH9 will be able to avoid hackers from recording and storing SSH session ciphertext (ciphertext is encrypted text transformed from plaintext using an encryption algorithm). This is done so that the hackers cannot access the ciphertext today, potentially avoiding situations where they might be able to decode ciphertext if they get access to quantum computers sometime in the future.   

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Also read: Fujitsu unveils quantum computing simulator to test quantum application for future

Many organisations are working on future proofing their networks against the potential threat of quantum computing. In early 2022, Nato finished its test run of securing communication flows that it said can withstand quantum computing attacks from hackers, according to a ZDNET report.   

“Securing NATO’s communications for the quantum era is paramount to our ability to operate effectively without fear of interception,” Konrad Wrona, Principal scientist at the Nato Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) said to ZDNET.  

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