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Adidas launches a pair of headphones that charge using solar energy

Adidas launches a pair of headphones that charge using solar energy
Photo Credit: Adidas
18 Aug, 2022
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Adidas, the Germany-based consumer goods brand known for its sportswear and accessories, has unveiled a new pair of headphones that you will technically never need to charge. Called the Adidas RPT-02 SOL, the headphones look like absolutely any other pair of mainstream wireless on-ear headphones, but with one key difference. Built into the thin film of its headband are solar cells, which when kept in the sun, conserve power that you can later use to listen to music through. 

The cells themselves are built by Swedish sustainable energy firm Exeger, and are slim solar cells that fit into the headband. Called Powerfoyle, the goal behind the product is to mitigate the intrusive form factor of putting large solar cells on a product. It is this that the Powerfoyle strip attempts to do atop the Adidas RPT-02 headphones. 

According to industry reports, the headphones offer reasonable battery backup as well. Such consumer products are not new per se — numerous wireless keyboards and universal remotes run on solar power. The clear advantage of such products lie in their ability to be used and charged as long as there is sunlight. This can be useful in hikes or other outdoor locations. 

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Solar energy as a whole has been increasingly pitched as part of sustainable smart city initiatives. A ‘Solar Futures Study’ by the United States Office of Renewable Energy has projected solar energy sources to contribute up to 45% of USA’s energy supplies by 2050 — close to three decades from now. 

However, solar gadgets are far from mainstream in today’s consumer electronics markets around the world. Indian electronics brand Micromax unveiled a solar phone, dubbed ‘X259’ in 2018 — in an attempt to showcase a solar-charged mobile device. However, the latter never reached scale, which is a problem with most solar powered devices. 

As a result, most solar cells in consumer appliances have been largely restricted to torchlights, keyboard and outdoor chargers.  

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